PKR wants assembly to discuss Sarawak’s oil and gas rights

PKR Sarawak vice-chairman and Batu Lintang assemblyman See Chee How wants the state assembly sitting to discuss the state’s oil and gas rights.

See said the special assembly sitting would make clear Sarawak’s collective stance with regard to three controversial laws – the Territorial Sea Act 2012, the Petroleum Development Act 1974, and the Tripartite Agreement signed between the federal government, state government and Petronas – that the chief minister had dismissed as “irrelevant”.

See said Chief Minister Abang Johari Openg’s many statements on the invalidity of the TSA, PDA and the agreement since the March 6 launching of Petroleum Sarawak Berhad (Petros) “make it sounds so simplistic”.

At the launch of Petros, the chief minister said the state had regained all the rights to its resources and that any person and company wishing to do business in the state’s oil and gas industry must have the necessary licences, permits, leases and approvals required under either the state’s Oil Mining Ordinance or the Gas Distribution Ordinance.

In a media conference two days later, Abang Johari said the TSA and PDA were “irrelevant” as they had violated Sarawak’s rights to its natural and hydrocarbon resources under the federal constitution. “any law that is ultra vires (beyond the powers) of the constitution under Article 4 of the federal constitution is void,” he said.

The chief minister had also asserted the state’s rights to its oil and gas were never surrendered upon the formation of Malaysia in 1963 and therefore the issuance of permits and licences for mines, mining leases and certificates in relation to the prospecting, mining and development of our petroleum resources were still intact.

The issuance of permits and licences were drawn up during the rule of the White Rajah and were later incorporated under Item 2(c) of the state list under the ninth schedule of the federal constitution.

“The chief minister had evoked a lively debate with his unequivocal announcement that Sarawak will assume full regulatory authority over its oil and gas upstream and downstream industry by July, at the launching of Petroleum Sarawak Berhad (Petros) on March 6.

“Elected representatives, aspirants vying for offices in the coming general election, academicians and political analysts have raised some legal but mostly political arguments in the tussle which by far have been entertaining and enlightening,” said See.

But he said it is the duty of the state leaders to protect the interests of Sarawak’s prized resources true to the spirit of “Sarawak First” and “Sarawakians First”.

“The special sitting of the Sarawak legislative assembly will provide a platform for the differing legal and political opinions, propositions and solutions to be deliberated, considered and adopted in order that Sarawak may speak and present itself with one unified voice.”

He said it would not be similar to the legislature’s motion on the request for 20% petroleum royalty, which was unanimously passed on May 7, 2014.

See said the chief minister is doing right to take a step further to pursue and assert the state’s autonomous rights over the valuable resources of oil and gas lying within the territorial boundary of Sarawak.

“I’m all for getting these things back but they should not be decided by himself or his cabinet.

“They must be brought to the assembly for a consensus.”

See also said the silence of Prime Minister Najib Razak and federal leaders “to Sarawak’s quest which is moving the earth under Sarawakians’ feet” was disconcerting.

“They are calm and relaxed, as if giving a nonchalant shrug, dismissing the expedition of the charging knights as a futile exercise.

“I am uneasy, and expecting the worst to come after the general election, as I think the stance of the federal government can be deciphered from the response of Petronas,” he said.

In a short statement to welcome and congratulate the setting up of Petros, Petronas said it was committed to supporting the state’s aspirations to actively participate in the state’s oil and gas industry “in line with the current framework of the Petroleum Development Act, 1974”.

“Despite what the chief minister and all other Sarawakians have said, Petronas is cool, referring us to look at the framework of the Petroleum Development Act, 1974.” – March 27, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/45349

Sabah politicians to intervene in Petronas suit

SABAH politicians are eager to intervene in Petronas’ suit to lay exclusive claim on the country’s petroleum resources and to be the regulator of the upstream industry.

Sabah, a petroleum-rich state, stands to lose its rights if the national oil company wins in its suit, said Sabah Star president Jeffrey Kitingan.

He said that while Petronas was relying on the Petroleum Development Act 1974 as the point of its argument, this law was in fact “unconstitutional”.

“The act goes against the federal constitution, which accords the rights of natural resources to the respective states.

“If the state government does not act, Sabah stands to lose all its rights on the oil if Petronas wins its suit,” he said during the Double Six Commemoration in Sembulan, Kota Kinabalu, today.

Petronas earlier this week filed an application before the Federal Court seeking a declaration that it is the exclusive owner of petroleum resources in Malaysia, including in Sarawak.

It is also seeking the apex court’s declaration that it is the regulator for the upstream industry throughout the country.

The hearing will be on June 12 in at the court in Putrajaya.

The move comes as Sarawak prepares to assume full regulatory authority over upstream and downstream aspects of the oil and gas industry in the state from next month through Petroleum Sarawak Bhd (Petros), a state-owned oil and gas exploration firm formed last year and officially launched in March.

Jeffrey said Gabungan Sabah aims to raise funds to engage lawyers to challenge Petronas’ bid.

He said that the state’s citizens, as stakeholders of Sabah’s natural resources, could take action if the state government did not.

Sabah Progressive Party president Yong Teck Lee said a team of lawyers were already working on building a case against Petronas. – June 6, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/52969

No more business as usual by July, Sarawak CM tells Petronas

SARAWAK Chief Minister Abang Johari Openg has told Petronas it cannot operate as usual from July, adding that the national oil company has not done enough to develop the country’s largest state.

His remarks, carried by satellite TV operator Astro tonight, underscore the state’s move to be independent of Putrajaya ahead of the 14th general election, widely expected to be called next month.

“Petronas must acknowledge the fact that it is our right for them to align with our laws,” the chief minister said in an interview on Astro Awani.

Last night, the chief minister, at the launch of the state-owned Sarawak Petroleum Bhd (Petros), said by July, Sarawak will assume full regulatory authority over the upstream and downstream aspects of the oil and gas industry in the state, and that all individuals and companies wishing to do business in the industry, including Petronas, must have the necessary licences, permits, leases and approvals from the state government.

The legal requirements are from either the Oil Mining Ordinance 1958 or Gas Distribution Ordinance 2016.

Prior to this, Petronas, vested with the powers under the Petroleum Development Act 1974 (PDA), dictated all aspects of the oil and gas industry in the state.

Petronas negotiated and awarded all the power-sharing contracts and its contractors.

Abang Johari said under the new operating condition, as Sarawak exercises its constitutional rights over the two resources, some Petronas decisions are also no longer for the company to make alone.

He gave the appointment of contractors as an example.

“They can’t appoint their contractors themselves. They must get their contractors and sub-contractors who are registered with us,” he said, referring to the new legal requirement for oil and gas companies to have licences, permits, leases and approvals from the state government.

Abang Johari said Sarawak never had a say in the appointment of contractors before.

“We don’t have a say especially in the question of the participation of our private sector.”

He said while the national petroleum company has posted billion of ringgits in profits, it is not doing enough to channel some of the money to develop the state.

“The understanding (for the PDA) was that, Petronas would use part of its revenue to develop the state. Over the years, you can see what has happened.

“Petronas has got lots of revenue, but our perception is that they concentrated their projects in the peninsula, while the state is struggling to get money to develop basic infrastructure.

“Fair enough, it has to be shared throughout the country, but there must be the equitable allocation of resources to Sarawak.”

He said Sarawakians can also see and think.

“Sarawakians are looking at the Twin Towers, and Sarawakians are also looking at all the bailouts of the federal government… and we can think that part of the money comes from Petronas.”

He said Petronas is not doing enough to help develop the state.

“Yes, they have their plant in Bintulu. That is their investment, and we have a certain equity.

“But what must be done is, there must be equitable jobs to be given to Sarawak companies.”

Despite the warning of change, Petronas said the company “is committed to supporting Sarawak’s aspirations to actively participate in the state’s oil and gas industry, in line with the current framework of the PDA”.

In offering its congratulations to the Sarawak government over the launch of Petros, and welcoming the participation of the state petroleum company in the oil and gas sector, Petronas said it is looking forward “to continue collaborating with the state for mutual benefit”. – March 7, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/41654

Venezuela launches oil-backed cryptocurrency

VENEZUELA formally launched its new oil-backed cryptocurrency yesterday, in an unconventional bid to haul itself out of a deepening economic crisis.

The leftist Caracas government put 38.4 million units of the world’s first state-backed digital currency, the Petro, on private pre-sale from the early hours.

During the first 20 hours of the pre-sale, which runs through March 19, Venezuela received “intent to buy” offers to the tune of US$735 million (RM2.9 billion), said President Nicolas Maduro.

“The Petro reinforces our independence and economic sovereignty, and will allow us to fight the greed of foreign powers that try to suffocate Venezuelan families to seize our oil,” he said.

A total of 100 million Petros will go on sale, with an initial value set at US$60, based on the price of a barrel of Venezuelan crude in mid-January – but subject to change.

Economist and cryptocurrency expert Jean-Paul Leidenz told AFP that prices during the pre-sale “will be agreed privately” and would then fluctuate according to the market when the initial coin offering of 44 million Petros was made on March 20.

Meanwhile, the government will reserve the remaining 17.6 million Petros.

Venezuela has the world’s largest proven oil reserves, but is facing a crippling economic and political crisis.

Vice-President Tareck El Aissami said the Petro would “generate confidence and security in the national and international market”.

Maduro announced in early December that Venezuela – which is under sanctions from the US, as well as the European Union – was creating the digital currency.

The Venezuelan leader said he expected the Petro to open “new avenues of financing” in the face of Washington’s sanctions, which prohibit US citizens and companies from trading debt issued by the country and its oil company, PDVSA.

But, experts are sceptical about the Petro’s chances of success, pointing out that the country’s deep economic imbalances would only serve to undermine confidence in the new currency.

“Theoretically, with cryptocurrencies, you could bypass the US financial system… but everything depends on generating confidence,” said economist Henkel Garcia.

Meanwhile, consulting firm Eurasia Group estimates that although Venezuela could raise some US$2 billion in the initial offer, it is “unlikely” that the Petro will be established as “a credible means of exchange”, beyond short-term “interest”.

Venezuela is mired in a deep economic crisis triggered in large part by a fall in crude oil prices and a drop in oil production, which accounts for about 96% of the country’s exports.

It is struggling to restructure its external debt, estimated at around US$150 billion by some experts. – AFP, February 21, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/39016

Sarawak CM must resolve oil, territorial disputes through the court, says DAP

WHILE there are valid considerations the Petroleum Development Act and the Territorial Sea Act have contravened the Federal Constitution, there was no legal basis for Chief Minister Abang Johari Abang Openg to declare they are not applicable in Sarawak.

Abang Johari, at the launch of the state-owned Sarawak Petroleum Bhd (Petros) on Wednesday, said Sarawak would assume full regulatory authority over the oil and gas industry in the state by July. 

He also claimed oil companies wishing to do business, including Petronas, must have the necessary approvals from the state government.

The chief minister was echoing statements on Monday the state has reclaimed its oil and gas rights, saying federal laws ensure the resources remain in Putrajaya’s hands.

Sarawak DAP women bureau affairs chief Irene Chang said laws Abang Johari’s claimed had no force such as the Petroleum Development Act 1974 (PDA), Territorial Sea Act 2012 (TSA) and Tripartite Agreement, signed by the federal government, Sarawak government and Petronas, have not been repealed or rescinded.

“To declare these two legislations as null and void and therefore have no application in Sarawak, the chief minister has to bring the matter before the courts of law. 

“Until the courts declare as such, the acts are in force and applicable in Sarawak,” Chang said. 

“To say otherwise is to give people false hope and the state government owes it to the people to set the matter right,” said the Bukit Assek assemblyman.

PDA gives Petronas exclusive ownership right to the oil and gas resources in Malaysia, and makes it the main regulatory body for upstream oil and gas activities. 

Under TSA, Sabah and Sarawak could not exert its sovereignty beyond 3-nautical miles from its shores, short of the 12-nautical mile limit on other coastal states. 

Chang urged Abang Johari to lead the state’s legislators to pass a motion to review the two acts and to get a court order to declare them null and void.

She added the state government might even have a legal argument to demand for the return of all the revenues earned from the resources from 1974 until now.

“Petros and Development Bank of Sarawak, although impressive and would create jobs, but whatever oil and gas that may be exploited in our waters, still need to go back to Petronas. 

“We are entitled to only 5% of the royalty,” she said. 

Chang said if the courts declared the two acts null and void and ultra vires to the Federal Constitution, then the Sarawak Barisan Nasional government needs to “apologise to the people of Sarawak.”

“It is time for the state gvernment to come clean and admit they allowed daylight robbery to be committed for the past 44 years. They need to prove their sincerity in claiming back what rightfully belongs to Sarawak. 

“Has the state BN government the political will to stand up to the prime minister and the federal government?

“Have they got the political courage to go up to their masters since they believe the acts are not applicable, Petronas should immediately cease operation in Sarawak waters?”

On March 2, Petronas announced profit of RM23.8 billion in 2016 and RM45.5 billion in 2017. – March 10, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/42196

Sarawak win over Petronas not certain yet

SARAWAK was quick to celebrate the Federal Court’s dismissal of Petronas’ legal challenge to obtain ownership rights over all petroleum resources in the country, even as the oil company’s lawyer cautioned that the fight was not over.

Chief Minister Abang Johari Openg said the state will now enforce all state laws regulating the oil and gas industry which includes requiring Petronas to obtain approval for its activities in Sarawak.

He said all companies, including Petronas, must by July 1 have the necessary licences, permits, leases and approvals required under either the Sarawak Oil Mining Ordinance (OMO) 1958 or the Gas Distribution Ordinance 2016.

Abang Johari, in a statement responding to the Federal Court’s decision, said it had paved the way for the state government to enforce its state laws, such as the OMO.

He also said state oil company Petroleum Sarawak Berhad (Petros) will be delegated the appropriate powers to implement the OMO.

However, Petronas’ lead counsel Malik Imtiaz Sarwar said the apex court had only ruled that the case did not come under its jurisdiction and had asked for it to be heard in the High Court instead.

Malik was reported by The Malay Mail saying that the Federal Court’s decision was on a “procedural matter” and that the issue was “still very much alive, not been decided in any way”.

The merits of the case have not been decided, he added.

In addition to seeking ownership of the country’s petroleum resources, Petronas also wants the court to declare the Sarawak OMO as overridden by the Petroleum Development Act 1974 (PDA). The OMO was drafted before Malaysia was formed.

The OMO was used by the Sarawak government to inform Petronas that the state would regulate its upstream oil and gas activities from July 1.

Abang Johari has previously said that the OMO would be amended to update its provisions, with a bill to be tabled at the state legislative assembly next month.

Malik today said the federal court’s did not make any decision on the PDA or the OMO, adding that he would wait for further instructions from Petronas before any filing at the High Court.

Bandar Kuching MP Kelvin Yii also expressed caution over any move to celebrate the Federal Court decision today.

In a Facebook post he said Sarawak had to “keep our eyes on the ball and not get ahead of ourselves”, adding that he expected Petronas to take the matter to the High Court.

“While I congratulate the legal team for their efforts and success, there is still an ambiguity in law and technically the status quo still stands.

“PDA 1974 wasn’t repealed, nor was there a ruling to say it does not apply in Sarawak. The legal argument is not about ‘ownership’ but more on regulatory powers of the upstream activities in Sarawak,” Yii said. – June 22, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/56201

Sarawak eases push for 20% oil and gas royalty

SARAWAK Housing Minister Dr Sim Kui Hian today said the state has eased on its push for a 20% increase – from the current 5% – of the oil and gas royalty.

It would instead focus on getting state petroleum company Petros, off the ground and the potential revenue it could generate.

“We are no longer talking about oil royalty,” the Sarawak United People’s Party (SUPP) president said while speaking to reporters at the party’s Chinese New Year open house in Kuching.

Echoing Chief Minister Abang Johari Openg’s earlier statement that the rights to prospect and mine for all mineral and natural resources in Sarawak, including oil and gas, are rights of the state as spelt out in the federal constitution, Dr Sim also reiterated “all the oil (and gas in the state) belongs to Sarawak”.

“What is ours, is ours. Its in the constitution,” he said in reference to the chief minister’s statement in a live interview over TV1 on Tuesday.

Abang Johari, in explaining why Petronas must obtain a prospecting license if it were to operate in the state, said while the federal constitution stipulates that the development of mineral resources falls under federal purview, it is however subject to item 2(c) of the state list when it comes to Sarawak.

According to item 2(c), permits and licences for prospecting for mines, mining leases and certificates are state matters.

The needs for the state permits and certificates are under the Sarawak Oil Mining Ordinance 1958.

“This means the state has the power to prospect and mine for oil and gas in the state just like Petronas,” the chief minister said.

“If Petronas wants to prospect for oil and gas in the state, they are subject to item 2(c) of the federal constitution and the licence must be issued by the state.

“I (only) work within the perimeters of the law and the federal constitution is supreme law.”

In his Chinese New Year message, the chief minister made it clear Petros will not “just be another production sharing contract company (PSC) but one that will operate alongside Petronas and play an active part in the downstream activities of the oil and gas industry in Sarawak”.

Abang Johari said Petros be an active player in the oil and gas industry alongside Petronas within two years.

With the prospect of a higher revenue Petros could potentially generate from newly discovered gas fields and re-exploiting old oil fields with new technologies, Dr Sim took a swipe at Harapan’s New Deal manifesto for Sarawak and Sabah and the promise to give Sarawak and Sarawak the 20% royalty as demanded.

“They (Harapan) only want to give us 20%. DAP wants to kongsi (share) Sarawak’s resources.

“Petros is just a beginning. The best is yet to come,” the cardiologist turned politician said. – February 16, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/38221

In challenge to Sarawak, Petronas wants court to declare it owns all national oil resources

NATIONAL oil company Petronas is asking the Federal Court to declare that it is the exclusive owner of petroleum resources in Malaysia, including in Sarawak.

It is also seeking the apex court’s declaration that it is the regulator for the upstream industry throughout the country.

In a statement, the company said it filed an application before the Federal Court today seeking these declarations based on the Petroleum Development Act 1974 (PDA).

“Petronas believes that the determination of the Federal Court would help provide clarity on its rights and position under the PDA.

“Petronas remains committed to supporting Sarawak’s aspiration to participate in the oil and gas industry in the state for as long as it is within the framework of the PDA,” the statement issued by Petronas’ group strategic communications said.

This move comes as Sarawak prepares to assume full regulatory authority over upstream and downstream aspects of the oil and gas industry in the state from next month.

In March this year, Chief Minister Abang Johari Openg said that Sarawak had regained all the rights to prospect, mine and develop oil and gas in the state, meaning that oil companies, including Petronas, wishing to operate in the state would have to secure a prospecting licence from the state government.

Sarawak Pakatan Harapan leaders, however, disagreed with Abang Johari, saying the state could not reclaim such rights until the PDA and other relevant federal laws were amended.

Petroleum Sarawak Bhd (Petros), a state-owned oil and gas exploration firm, was formed last year and officially launched in March. Abang Johari had said that Petros would not be a partner of Petronas and would instead have the “same status” as the national oil company.

The issue of Sarawak’s rights to its oil resources has long been a contentious one, with the state demanding more than the 5% oil and gas royalty it receives from the federal government each year.

The PH election manifesto for GE14 promised to increase the royalty to 20%. – June 4, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/52330

Bidayuh oil and gas veteran picked as Petros CEO, industry sources say

OIL industry veteran Saau Kakok is expected to head Sarawak-owned Petroleum Sarawak Bhd (Petros) after months of searching for a chief executive officer, industry sources say.

Saau, who was former special projects vice-president for Asia of the US-based independent oil company Hess Corporation, is the man Sarawak Chief Minister Abang Johari Openg has headhunted for the job and was not among the numerous applicants for the post, they said.

The 64 year-old is one of only a handful of Bidayuh oil and gas executives holding very senior positions in a multi-national petroleum company.

According to his profile on his LinkedIn page, he resigned from his vice-president position at Hess at the end of last year.

Abang Johari on Sunday said he has found “the right person for the job” and gave only one hint – that the person was a Bidayuh with experience in oil and gas industry.

The Bidayuh are the second largest of state’s ethnic tribes.

Petroleum-rich Sarawak formed Petros last year amid long-standing unhappiness over the 5% oil and gas royalty the state receives from the federal government. Sarawak has been demanding that the amount be increased to 20%.

The state government said Petros would be of “equal status” as national oil company Petronas and was meant to protect Sarawak’s interest in the industry by allowing it to participate in upstream oil and gas development, particularly in the exploration and extraction of oil and gas within Sarawak waters.

Oil and gas executives have told The Malaysian Insight that Saau was indeed picked for the job as the native of Ulu Padawan, located just outside Kuching the state capital, was a person with vast experience in the industry.

“It’s Saau. We are positive it’s him as he has been having a few meetings with Petros board chairman Hamid Bugo over the position this week,” an executive said.

Saau joined Hess in 2011 as vice-president of global new business development.

He completed his tertiary education at University of Malaya, graduating with honours in a Bachelor of Engineering degree in 1977.

Like many Sarawakians, he first joined the oil and gas industry via Shell.

His LinkedIn page stated his last position at Shell as vice-president of Shell EP International Ltd, a position he held from 2007 to 2009.

In Hess, Saau has held several positions including vice-president for Asia-Pacific, as a director in Hess Malaysia and Thailand Ltd, in Hess Oil & Gas Sdn Bhd and in Hess (Indonesia-South Sesulu) Limited.

He was with the London-based Hess (Indonesia-South Sesulu) Ltd from January 2014 to December 31, 2016.

Wilfred Nissom, one of his former teachers at the Dragon Secondary School (later renamed SMK Tun Abdul Razak), described Saau as “very sharp but quiet and humble”.

He also remembered Sauu as being a good athlete who had represented the school as a long-distance runner in inter-school sports meets.

The Malaysian Insight was also told by industry sources that the “humble” Saau had expressed that he was not good enough for the job and had asked Hamid to look for someone else.

Last November, Hamid said the Petros board was in the midst of screening 40 applications for the post that was advertised in local and national newspapers.

The other members of the Petros board are Bintulu Port Holdings CEO Mohammad Medan Abdullah, Sarawak Energy Bhd CEO Sharbini Suhaili, former Shell Gas & Power Malaysia managing director Heng Hock Cheng and Sarawak Public Works Department director Zuraimi Sabki.

All of them had served in various capacities in the oil and gas industry. – February 14, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/37884

Sarawak regains all rights to its oil and gas

SARAWAK has regained all the rights to prospect, mine and develop oil and gas in the state, said Chief Minister Abang Johari Openg today.

He said the state would by July “assume full regulatory authority over the upstream and downstream aspects of the oil and gas industry in Sarawak” 

This means that after July, oil companies, including Petronas, wishing  to operate in the state would have to secure a prospecting licence from the state government.

Prior to this, under the Petroliam Development Act (PDA), the oil companies received approval from the federal government.

Abang Johari said with the state now enforcing its rights and laws, “all persons and companies involved in the oil and gas industries in Sarawak, must henceforth, have the necessary licences, permits, leases and approvals required under either the Oil Mining Ordinance or the Gas Distribution Ordinance”. 

“They are required to regularise their operations and activities to comply with all state laws including those relating to the use and occupation of land”

He however, gave the assurance that enforcement of state laws would “not jeopardise the interests or investments of Petronas and other companies already involved in the oil and gas industry in Sarawak, whether upstream or downstream”.

“But their business and operational activities must be aligned with our laws and regulations.”

The chief minister said the state cabinet had approved a bill to amend the Oil Mining Ordinance to “update its provisions and to provide better enforcement”. 

The bill would be tabled at the next sitting of the state legislative assembly in July, he said.

Sarawak’s first oil well was commissioned on December 22,1910 in Miri. 

In 1920, the Rajah issued what was known as the Shell Concession Order to designate the area in Miri for the exploration and mining of oil by Sarawak Oilfield Limited – which was owned by Shell.

Exploration for oil offshore Baram area took place in the 1930s by the Dutch and the British.

 In 1952, the Sarawak Colonial government issued an oil mining lease, in the form of a deed, to Sarawak Oilfields Limited with the liberties, right and privileges to explore and mine all “the petroleum lying or within under or throughout the territory comprising the Colony of Sarawak including lands beneath all territorial water.”

In 1954, the Queen in Council passed the Sarawak (Alteration of Boundaries) Order to extend the boundaries of Sarawak to include the area the seabed and its subsoil which lies beneath the high seas contiguous to the territorial waters of Sarawak. 

In 1958, Council Negeri passed the Oil Mining Ordinance to “make better provision in the law relating to oil mining in Sarawak and its Continental Shelf”.

Petros in August last year was granted a prospecting licence to mine oil and natural gas in the state.

Meanwhile, Abang Johari confirmed Saau Kakok was the Petros CEO. 

Saau, a Bidayuh, has spent almost 40 years of his career in the oil and gas industry. 

His last position was Asia vice-president for a US-based independent oil company. – March 6, 2018.

Source: https://www.themalaysianinsight.com/s/41483

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